CHART OF THE DAY: Managing the algorithms

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It must be ‘Algorithm Week’ on the blog, given that yesterday I posted a piece about how HR folks need to consider carefully how algorithms and other intelligent technologies are introduced into HR and talent management practices. 

Keeping with that theme, today’s Chart of the Day is also about algorithms, more specifically about how the overall role and responsibility of HR and HR leaders might shift as more intelligent technologies are introduced into workplaces. The chart comes to us from an MIT Technology Review briefing paper titled ‘Asia’s AI Agenda: How Asia is speeding up global artificial intelligence adoption’, a look at how the increased adoption of automation and other ‘smart’ technologies are going to impact work, workplaces, and too, the practice of HR.

The entire paper is interesting, but for today’s chart I wanted to share what MIT’s survey of Asia HR leaders revealed about how these HR leaders see their roles changing along with the changing workplace (and workforce).

Here’s the chart, then some FREE comments from me after the data:

Three quick takes…

1. First off, it is really interesting, (and I think really encouraging), that more than 87% of HR leaders in the survey realize that these new technologies are going to have a ‘major impact’ on the role of the HR leader moving forward. The first step in the grieving process is acceptance, (actually, I am not sure if that is true, but don’t have the time to look it up, so just pretend it is true anyway), so it is a good sign that the vast majority of these HR leaders are at least cognizant if not accepting that advances in automation and smart tech are going to change the HR role. 

2. Next, it is also interesting, (if possibly a little naive), in that fully two-thirds of these surveyed HR leaders see that their roles will expand to encompass the ‘overall productivity’ of both people and the machines and other intelligent technologies that are increasingly being introduced into their workplaces and processes. I have to admit to being a little surprised that so many HR respondents seem ready or at least willing to get into the ‘machine management’ business.

3. What that does imply however, is that these HR leaders wanting to expand the traditional talent management role to include machine management as well are going to have to develop an entire new set of expertise and skills, (not to mention some baseline understanding of this technologies), that have as far as I can tell never been a part of HR or talent management in the past.  I am not sure if ‘managing’ the machines and algorithms is going to be easier or harder than managing people, (if I had to bet, I am going with ‘easier’), but either way it will require an expansion of the traditional HR role beyond what most if not all HR leaders are prepared for.

Check out the paper from MIT if you want to learn more. Really interesting stuff on how business and HR are thinking about the increasing incorporation of automation and algorithms in the workplace.

HR

via Steve Boese’s HR Technology http://ift.tt/MS9XNl

November 29, 2016 at 02:21AM

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