Learn a new word: The Feature Factory

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Quick shout-out to John Cutler writing at the Hackernoon site for this outstanding piece (and the source for today’s ‘Learn a new word’ submission – The Feature Factory.

What is a ‘Feature Factory’ in the context of a software development function?’

From the piece on Hackernoon, ’12 Signs You’re Working in a Feature Factory’ to get an idea –

I’ve used the term Feature Factory at a couple conference talks over the past two years. I started using the term when a software developer friend complained that he was “just sitting in the factory, cranking out features, and sending them down the line.”

How do you know if you’re working in a feature factory? (SMB Note: there are 12 signs in the post, I am just going to grab two of them here, but you really should read the entire piece)

3. ‘Success theater’ around "shipping", with little discussion about impact. You can tell a great deal about an organizations by what it celebrates.

7. Obsessing about prioritization. Mismatch between prioritization rigor (deciding what gets worked on) and validation rigor (deciding if it was, in fact, the right thing to work on). Prioritization rigor is designed exclusively to temper internal agendas so that people “feel confident”. Lots of work goes into determining which ideas to work on, leaving little leeway for adjustments and improvisation based on data. Roadmaps show a list of features, not areas of focus and/or outcomes 

Really, really good stuff for project managers and development teams to think about.

Why should this matter for readers of Steve’s HR Tech?

I can think of two reasons straight up.

One, it is worthwhile to think about your current and potentially future providers of HR technology solutions in this context. Does your provider talk about their product roadmap for the next year or two in the same way you run down your holiday shopping or grocery list? Do they talk about the future as simply the container in which they will ‘ship’ more features and gadgets? Or do they discuss their plans and directions using your challenges and your desired outcomes as the context in which they are organizing and planning to deliver new solutions? I know I have written about this before, but it is worth repeating – almost any provider can build the capability you need if they think they have to. What is much more important for your long term success with a tech provider is if yours and their visions of the future are in alignment, and the methods, pace, and you feel confident in the manner in which you will both grow and evolve to be better prepared to succeed in that future. That is what is really important. Not just "shipping."

And the other reason that this idea of the ‘Feature factory’ is important? Because in late 2016 it is pretty likely that all but the very smallest organizations have in-house IT and development teams themselves, and these teams are comprised of folks that both do not want to work in an environment that could be described as a feature factory, and at the same time have lots of career options that don’t include your organization. As HR leaders, it is probably worthwhile from time to time to check in with some of your really important, hard to find, and harder to replace tech talent types and see how they really think and feel about the organization’s development climate. If you are treating these talented and in-demand folks too much like cogs in the machine, chances are they won’t want to stay in that machine for too long. They will see your shop as a skills and resume builder stepping stone to somewhere more interesting, more fun, and more challenging.

Ok, that’s it from me. Tip your servers.

Have a great weekend!

HR

via Steve Boese’s HR Technology http://ift.tt/MS9XNl

December 2, 2016 at 12:51AM

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